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20130113
20130121
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone
into the deficit and pay off the debt. >> you know what i didn't like today. i thought it was annoying, he may have to slow down social security payments if-- and tell you why, there's never any suggestion maybe congress shouldn't be paid salaries, the senate not be paid salaries, the president not be paid salaries, cut down on air force one. your constituent payment to go home on commercial aircraft, instead stay here and save money on travel and get the job done. there's any discussion of the politicians to take the hit it's the social security recipients. >> he wants to use the military paycheck to try to scare people and hurt the elderly. you don't have to do that, there's revenue to the treasury on a daily basis. the problem is we deficit spend about 3 to 4 billion dollars a day. we collect, we spend about 10 billion a day and that means that we deficit. we have to borrow 3 to 4 billion dollars a day. we spend more than 700 million dollars a day in interest on a national debt. there are lots of things to do. the president has lots of discretion to curb back that spending to make sure that soci
on the table. >> ironically would probably increase our deficit. it is absurd. >> the president won't back down on the debt ceiling or on gun safety. >> the pressing issue of gun reform. >> exactly one month after the tragedy at sandy hook. >> if there is a step we can take that will save even one child we should take that step. >> gun violence continues to wreak its deadly toll each day. >> this is a moment to act. >> congress is incapable of passing an assault weapon ban. >> everybody is totally upset by it. >> what makes sense? what works? >> this is a moment to act. >> this is a promise to turn the conversation into actions. >> if there is a step we can take that will save even one child, we should take that step. >> the lecturer in chief returns to the east room of the white house today to explain something to congressional republicans that previous presidents have not had to explain to congress. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay fo
for the taxpayers' use or the expression goes, to reduce the federal deficit. >> thank you, gentleman. i yield back, mr. chairman. >> mr. hastings. >> i don't have any questions. >> thank you very much. without a doubt of funds, which i'm working on, -- [inaudible] [laughter] >> thank you, mr. chairman. i ask that the gentleman, i know he's speaking on behalf of the constituents when we bring the amendment to the bill, the size of the package with the addition of your amendment, becomes larger than many entire appropriations bills. $60 billion. that's larger than homeland security appropriations bill. mr. king, that's larger than the financial services appropriation bill. that's larger than the state department foreign operations appropriations bill. these are bills from which this congress deliberates for months. hearing the chairman say before you came up to testify that he was committed to making sure that your folks get those things that they need. hearing the priorities that everyone has laid out, knowing these are not optional things that are needed, these are mandatory things that are need
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. for decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children's future for the temporary convenience of the present. to continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals. you and i, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we're not bound by that same limitation? we must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. and let there be no misunderstanding -- we are going to begin to act, beginning today. [applause] the economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. they will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. they will go away because we as americans have the capacity now, as we've had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom. in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. [applause] from t
't create new deficit spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family that's trying to improve its credit rating. families that say, i know how we can save money, we won't pay her credit card bills. it was the sole solution to the debt ceiling in august of 2011 in the u.s. downgraded last time. so all these issues are important and it's very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been addressed. nevertheless, we still have fairly restrictive fiscal policies now. it is estimated that fed
there is a third phase here they consider country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to gdp, deficit to gdp down around 3%, which is all economists are training center greer that areas we can begin to cruise the country and as my grandfather used to say that the grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, we may very well be able to meet the goal we set out to do, which is to have roughly $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and put us on that past. i didn't come here to talk about any of this important subjects today because as important as they all are today we have a mortgage and indie media call and that is how to do with the epidemic of gun violence in america. the one of the statistics better than anyone, so i'm not going to repeat it. on that score i might add ale in a credible threat of gratitude to many of you at the table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity and this ballroom, nor do we have any ballroom, but we all know, it wanted knowledges we have to do some gain. we
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
deficit hawk. the republican senate committee budget guru, and he is offsetting most of the first slice. the bill's actually two pieces, 17 billion and 34 billion. and he's offsetting the 17 billion portion with a across-the-board cut. so it'll be interesting to see if that passes or not. you know, all democrats will vote against it, and i suspect that it will fail. but it'll be interesting to see. for him it's important because they want to establish the principle that emergency spending needs to be offset with spending cuts. which is something that democrats are very afraid of, because they feel like every time there's a disaster, republicans use it as an excuse to go after domestic programs, social services and so forth. so that'll be an important precedent, and then we'll see what happens in the senate. you know, we'll probably see a house/senate conference on the bill or some ping-ponging between the chambers and probably delaying final enactment. >> host: yeah. and the washington times reporting this morning that the conservative group for growth is threatening to punish members w
important thing he could do is tax reform and deficit control. if he could put those two things together, that'd be bigger than health care. >> steve: you know what? if he were to work with the republicans talking reform-- >> i think that's a lock for next year. >> steve: well, he wants to do something about it. some republicans want to do something about it, remember last time with health care, the republicans had a bunch of ideas and the democrats shut them out completely. maybe this time bipartisan. >> brian: that's not the harry reid i know. >> alisyn: let's get to other stories in the headlines, late last noos night, two drones strikes, at least three of the bodies were burned beyond recognition. the death toll could rise in the hostage crisis at a gas plant in algeria. many were killed including one american. two americans are still missing and the crisis ended yesterday when the algerian army attacked the plant killing two militants. president obama said this is attack is another reminder of the threat posed by al-qaeda and other violent extremist groups in north africa. and the p
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is
of what i believe to he faces. reforming immigration, reducing the deficit gun control, averting climate change, maybe iran's nuclear program. certainly you get a sense it's going to be mainly domestic. certainly if you're looking at the tick box in the first four years, i would say killing bin laden, killing gadhafi, the american help to the arab spring, although it's not without difficulty, pulling troops in iraq and setting a timetable for afghanistan, these have all been a seen that president obama would rather focus on domestic issues rather than foreign issues. >> i think that's true. and i think you see that when he takes the bully pulpit. he doesn't go out and speak well. they' had several blunders on foreign policy issues. the most recent one is a failure for america to retaliate in some meaningful or symbolic way on the death of an american ambassador in benghazi. >> interesting point. the george bush administration would have piled in there, blown things to pieces and exacted terrible retribution. that's the american way for a long time. is that the right way? would that creat
, deficits, gun control, immigration. a lot to do and not a great environment to get it done. but with us now, two men who may not have to worry too much about that, but who may give us great insights if possible to get great things done. barney frank, the former democratic congressman from massachusetts and steve latourette, republican from ohio. first to you, congressman, as the democrat, what does the president have to do differently in the second term to have a more cooperative, working environment. to you, sir, what does the republican party need to do to try to get some things done? >> i have to differ with the preface, john. >> i thought you might. >> barack obama -- look, this notion that partisanship has taken over. it began when barack obama became president. i was chairman of the financial service committee of 2007 in the bush administration and i worked very closely with hank paulson, secretary of the treasury. we worked on putting fannie mae and freddie mac to stop the lawsuits. george bush went to harry reid and nancy pelosi in december of 2007. he said the economy is slipping,
, we reduce the federal deficit. >> i thank the gentleman. i yield back, mr. chairman. >> i don't have any question. i support the gentleman's amendment over all. >> thank you very much. >> mr. woodall? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i would ask the gentleman because i know he's speaking on behalf of the his constituents when you bring -- when he brings this amendment, but the size of this package, larger than many and how appropriation bills, $60 billion. that's larger than homeland security appropriations bill that mr. king authorizes. that's larger than the financial services appropriations bill. that's larger than the state department foreign operations appropriations bill, and these are all built with which this congress deliberates vermont's. hearing -- four months. he was committed to making sure your folks get those things that they need, hearing the priority that if one has laid out knowing that these are not optional things that are needed, these are mandatory things that are needed. these are items that new jersey and new york will absolutely bring to fruition. these tunnels ar
to being able to destabilize our debt and deficit. this is insanity. he's making the case we stopped corporate loopholes his white house after biden demand this had he put the loopholes in the fiscal deal. and the president is disingenuous beyond wlbelief. of course he's irritated he's walking a tightrope on this, a thin edge. >> megyn: doked for president clinton who i just mentioned with michael reagan, this national journal article today that talks about among others, bill clinton, his ability to reach across the aisle and make deals with people he didn't necessarily love politically. but the suspicion of government feeding hungry children, we have it teed up, and helped in this president's ability to do this and i'll get your reaction, this is on suspicion, take a listen. >> they have suspicions about social security. they have suspicions about whether government should make sure that kids in poverty are getting enough to eat or whether we should be spending money on medical research, so they've got a particular view of what government should do and should be. >> megyn: go ahead,
and deficit spending. those are -- >> a balanced way. i'm sure he'll use that language as well. >> a balanced way. opposing goals, but he intends to do them both. >> lynn, do you think we'll hear any talk of energy or climate change at all in the speech tomorrow? >> i do. i think climate change will be an added starter when we look at agenda goals, and i don't know if we had this discussion two months ago, even if curbing gun violence would have been something we would have thought would come up tomorrow. >> yeah. >> but i think that it is -- it is just something that the obama administration did not put a super emphasis on in the last four years and will be something that we'll hear about, in addition to the things that bill talked about. but i think somehow that obama will try to still cast himself as somebody who can try to bring more calm voice to civic discourse. i don't see how it could happen right away, because it didn't happen in the last four years. not sure how he can figure out how to navigate is this time. >> let's listen to some of the other promises made in the president's last
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)